Aboriginal Governance

Faculty of Native Studies

The Certificate in Aboriginal Governance and Partnership program centres on developing knowledge while increasing analytical and applied skills suited to the unique governance issues and opportunities facing Aboriginal peoples and their non-Aboriginal partners today. The curriculum features theory and practice for negotiations and partnership between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal entities, including best practices for successful partnership, leadership, government, management, administration, and business growth for First Nations, Métis and Inuit organizations, and their non-Aboriginal counterparts.

University of Alberta students may pursue the Certificate in Aboriginal Governance and Partnership by fulfilling the existing requirements in their respective disciplines and by completing a minimum of 18 units of course weight of specified courses. A part-time certificate program is available for those not in a degree program; please see the University of Alberta Calendar for specific requirements.

Economic Development

NS 330 LEC A2

Prerequisite: NS 110, 111, and 240 or 290, or consent of the faculty.

This course will review underlying factors which affect the economies of Native communities and examine different approaches to Native Economic development, including community, corporate and entrepreneurial business approaches. The Native perspective to Native Economic Development will be a principal theme. The objective of the course will be to assess approaches to the identification, planning, and implementation of economic development strategies for Native communities. Sections may be offered in a Cost Recovery format at an increased rate of fee assessment; refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.

Dates

May 8 - June 16, 2017

Location

University of Alberta North Campus


Negotiation Strategies

NS 420 SEM A1

Prerequisites: *3 in any NS 300 level or consent of the faculty

An exploration of the theory and practice of negotiation and mediation from different perspectives, including perspectives from the dominant society and Indigenous peoples. The strategies of litigation, and coercion to overcome conflict and achieve settlements of disputes will also be examined. These negotiation theories will then be applied to concrete dispute situations in Canada, including multi-party disputes over land, governance, development of resources and the environment. This course will be taught in a seminar format. Sections may be offered in a Cost Recovery format at an increased rate of fee assessment; refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.

Dates

May 8 - 26, 2017

Location

University of Alberta North Campus

Contact Information

Faculty of Native Studies
2-31 Pembina Hall
P: 780-492-2991
E: nativestudies@ualberta.ca